Tuesday, 23 July 2013

Round Holes and Pegs of Another Shape . . .

     Life is always on the move . . . one could say that change is constant, but that may sound a tad confusing? Actually the only constant is what's unfolding, and that's because the unfolding simply unfolds constantly. There is no end to it existentially. At death? Well you'll find out soon enough!

At work recently the experience of constant change hit me, Doug McMillan, SMACK in the face when the project I had been running for six months was closed down by the management team in a knee-jerk reaction to certain circumstances that had arisen. Basically the management team decided I was needed elsewhere after two employees were suspended indefinitely whilst certain activities were being investigated - my project was closed down, I was moved on instantly and had no say in the matter . . .

The role I had been working in was ideal for me, it suited my skill base and personality perfectly, so naturally enough I did very well, and my reputation grew. The new role I have undertaken doesn't suit my skill base, my methodical work style and personality at all, and so - naturally enough - I'm struggling with it somewhat.

Unfortunately, in my experience, good management teams are hard to come by. People think that because one is good at one thing they can simply move one into another role and you'll be able to make the switch effortlessly; it ain't necessarily so!

When I initially took on the project six months ago it instinctively felt right, and I was most definitely a round peg in a round hole. Obviously that's not how one feels in this new role, nonetheless I am attempting to make the adjustment, although this particular hole has a few rough edges!

    What, if anything, can one do? Answers on a blogpost . . . 

At the moment (ah, the unfolding moment) one is simply doing what is put before one as it unfolds. One is also communicating with the management team in an attempt to explain why this new role is not a good long term solution for all concerned.

Hm, Arsessistic Management? Maybe . . .